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Suit Fabric

Learn how to choose a suit fabric below.

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Suit Fabric Selection Tips

Suit fabric really does make the suit literally and figuratively. Linen, polyester, wool, cotton, tweed, herringbone, flannel, silk, poplin, seersucker, and cashmere, are the materials that usually make up a suit.

Below you will find a brief overview of the different types of suit material you may find while searching for your ideal suit. Click through each to get a quick rundown on the advantages and disadvantages of each suit fabric.

A mens linen suit will not feel the same as a polyester suit, and a polyester suit will not feel the same as a wool suit...etc. Also a suits price will vary greatly depending on what kind of material it is made up of.

Below you will find a brief overview of the different types of suit material you may find while searching for your ideal suit. Click through each to get a quick rundown on the advantages and disadvantages of each suit fabric.

Also, remember that their really isn't a perfect suit material. While wool is your best all around suit material, you'll find that each material has a specific time and place where it really excels. This means that the best suit material may vary depending on where you are wearing your suit.

Cashmere Suits are extremely soft and comfortable. Unfortunately, they are very cost prohibitive for the great majority of us. Also, they surprisingly don't always look to be made of the best suit fabric.

The cotton suit is light and breathable and doesn't cost much to buy. Its downside is that it wrinkles incredibly quick and does not hold up well over time.

A flannel suit is durable, soft and warm. However, its durability comes at the price of being heavy. Also, being warm is not always a great thing to be.

The herringbone suit is heavy, coarse, durable, and hard to wrinkle. This suit is fine in the winter, but will only be taking up closet space in the summer.

A mens linen suit is machine washable, light, and fairly inexpensive to buy. This suit suffers the same disadvantages as a standard cotton suit.

Polyester suits are soft, hard to wrinkle, and very inexpensive. These suits look cheap and can get hot.

A poplin suit is lightweight, soft, and smooth. This type of suit material is not very durable and isn't all that inexpensive either.

Seersucker suits are soft, cool, and do not require ironing. This is a classic summer suit, but should not be worn in winter.

Silk suits are smooth, light, soft, and have a shimmering appearance under light. These suits really aren't meant for the office and have gone out of style elsewhere as well.

Tweed suits are heavy, durable, and hard to wrinkle. These suits are similar to herringbone suits and can be heavy and hot in the summer time.

Wool suits are durable and versatile. When combined with polyster, these suits provide the perfect balance of looks, durability and low maintenance.

Here is a quick rundown on which materials to wear with each season.

Summer Suits should be worn from late May to mid September. This rule doesn't apply to places that are always cold or always hot.

Winter Suits should be used in late September to mid May. These suits are great for sales people that don't want to make their cold calls literal.

The best advice is to choose a suit material that is both comfortable on you and on your wallet. My personal opinion is that it is always safe to go with a wool suit and you could fill up your wardrobe completely with wool suits and be set for life.

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